Allergen Focus

Thursday, July 16, 2015
The history of neomycin, its properties and prevalence. 
Friday, April 17, 2015
This article discusses the history of rubber, its properties and emergence of black rubber mix.    
Tuesday, February 24, 2015
The need for US legislation regulating the amount of nickel released from products is crucial.    
Friday, November 21, 2014
This article highlights the Allergen of the Year “awardees” since 2000.  
Wednesday, September 17, 2014
Recently with the surging advance of portable electronics and mobile devices, cobalt is becoming more frequently used.
Friday, March 6, 2009
Cosmetics have been in vogue for many centuries. While evidence of their use reaches back to the ancient Egyptians, the cosmetics industry is still booming today. Cosmetics have come a long way from the original kohl, antimony-based makeup that was once used on the eyelids, eyebrows, and eyelashes.1 According to Global Cosmetics Industry magazine, the cosmetic industry generates some $290.9 billion in sales annually.2 Cosmetics are defined by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as “articles intended to be rubbed, poured, sprinkled, or sprayed on, introduced into, or otherwise applied to the
Friday, January 9, 2009
In 1997 the Food and Drug Administration approved the Thin-layer Rapid Use Epicutaneous (T.R.U.E.) Test for use as a valuable, first-line screening tool to assess for allergic contact dermatitis. Many dermatologists use this standard tool in their practices and refer to contact dermatitis referral centers when the T.R.U.E. test fails to identify a relevant allergen. Specifically, with the advent of panel 3 on the T.R.U.E. test, 28 of the most common allergens can be screened. The allergens used completely diagnose only 54.1% of the patients with positive reactions.1 The test is thought to i
Monday, November 10, 2008
In 1997, the Food and Drug Administration gave indication to the Thin-layer Rapid Use Epicutaneous (T.R.U.E.) Test for use as a valuable, first-line screening tool in the diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Many dermatologists and allergists use this standard tool in their practices and refer to contact dermatitis referral centers when the T.R.U.E test fails to identify a relevant allergen. Specifically, the T.R.U.E. test screens for 46 distinct allergens in addition to the Balsam of Peru mixture, and is thought to adequately identify an allergen in approximately 24.5% of patients.
Thursday, October 16, 2008
In 1997, the Food and Drug Administration gave indication to the Thin-layer Rapid Use Epicutaneous (T.R.U.E.) Test for use as a valuable, first-line screening tool in the diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Many dermatologists and allergists use this standard tool in their practices and refer to contact dermatitis referral centers when the T.R.U.E test fails to identify a relevant allergen. Specifically, the T.R.U.E. test screens for 46 distinct allergens in addition to the Balsam of Peru mixture, and is thought to adequately identify an allergen in approximately 24.5% of patients.
Monday, September 22, 2008
In 1997 the Food and Drug Administration gave indication to the Thin-layer Rapid-Use Epicutaneous (T.R.U.E.) test for use as a “valuable,” first-line screening tool in the diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Many dermatologists and allergists use this standard tool in their practices and refer to contact dermatitis referral centers when the T.R.U.E test fails to identify a relevant allergen. Specifically, the T.R.U.E. test screens for 46 distinct allergens in addition to the balsam of Peru mixture, and this test is thought to adequately identify an allergen in approximately 24.5% o