We report a pediatric case of sporotrichosis with zoonotic transmission of Sporothrix schenckii from a feline to an otherwise healthy 2-year-old girl.

News

News
Wednesday, December 16, 2015
NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A new, freely available database details possible interactions between antifungal agents and other drugs.

Research in Review

Research in Review
Thursday, January 23, 2014
Maduromycosis, also known as mycetoma, is a progressive granulomatous infection involving the skin and subcutaneous tissues with potential to invade muscle and bone.1,2 The term mycetoma means “fungal tumor” in Greek,1 but causative organisms can be fungal or bacterial.  
Research in Review
Monday, December 16, 2013
Rhinosporidiosis is a chronic, granulomatous mucous membrane infection presenting most commonly as a polyploid mass of the nasal, oral, ocular or genital mucosa.1 The taxonomy of the etiologic agent responsible for the disease has been long debated. First described in 1896 as a sporozoan by Guillermo Seeber, it was believed for several years to be a fungus and given the name Rhinosporidium seeberi by J.H. Ashworth in 1923.2,3 Recently, sequence analysis of an 18S small ribosomal DNA subunit has again redirected the debate. Due to this finding, the infectious agent is now grouped among a clade of fish parasites known as Mesomycetozoea.4 
Research in Review
Tuesday, August 20, 2013
Many patients who present with nail dystrophy are concerned about the appearance of their nails. “Oh by the way, I think I may have nail fungus,” says a recent patient. We have all been there. We are wrapping up the office visit and about to walk out of the exam room and the patient mentions their nail condition. Wouldn’t it be nice if we had an easy way to get to the root of the problem in a more efficient manner? The goal of this article is to help navigate through the history, diagnosis and treatment of common nail disorders. 
Research in Review
Monday, July 22, 2013
Chromoblastomycosis, or chromomycosis, is a subcutaneous, dematiaceous fungal infection, resulting from skin inoculation by pigmented fungi including Fonsecaea pedrosoi, Phialophora verrucosa, Cladophialophora carrionii, Fonsecaea compacta and Wangiella dermatitidis.1 F. pedrosoi and C. carrionii are the most common causes of chromoblastomycosis.2