AK
A recent study assessed whether a new tool for assessing the severity of actinic keratoses could determine a patient’s risk for developing squamous cell carcinoma.

News

News
Monday, January 11, 2010
PhotoMedex and Galderma Laboratories, LP, have entered into a co-promotion agreement for Galderma’s photodynamic therapy application for the treatment of actinic keratoses (AKs). Under the terms of the agreement, the sales force at PhotoMedex will promote Galderma’s drug methyl aminolevulinate Cream 16.8% (Metvixia) and Galderma’s light-emitting diode (Aktilite CL128 LED) lamp to healthcare professionals, including dermatologists, plastic surgeons and cosmetic surgeons throughout the United States. Galderma will provide marketing support and distribution. The 3-year agreement begins in January
News
Thursday, September 4, 2008
Reducing Irritation While Effectively Treating AKs A new combination approach between topical 5-FU and hydrocortisone butyrate 0.1% lipocream. Traditionally, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) cream is one modality that has been effectively used as a treatment for widespread actinic keratoses.1 Several treatment regimens have been used with topical 5-FU in the treatment of AKs.2,3,4 The common manner of topical 5-FU use has been morning and night application for 2 to 4 weeks.5 However, the high degree of irritation associated with its use may lead to treatment failures due to noncompliance or in

Research in Review

Research in Review
Thursday, September 4, 2008
Actinic keratosis (AK) is so common — we tend to see it, treat it and move on. We don’t think about the name or why it’s named what it is. (Nor do we tend to think a lot about the biology behind AK.) The name wasn’t chosen because of its biology or pathology but because of its crusty texture. In truth, it’s a misnomer. It’s not a keratosis like a seborrheic keratosis but instead an evolving malignancy. In my opinion, as well as that of many others, it’s time to change the name of this lesion to reflect what it is rather than the way it feels.