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Hidradenitis Suppurativa Content

News
Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is associated with lower quality of life. Findings from a recent study showed arthralgia can exacerbate this burden in patients.
News
The use of complementary and alternative medicine among patients with HS is very common, according to the findings of a recent survey, which also showed nearly 50% of patients did not find conventional therapy very successful for treating their skin disease.
News
Findings from a recent study showed about 75% of patients with HS had deranged iron status suggestive of iron deficiency, highlighting a possible need to assess iron levels and the need to investigate the therapeutic impact of iron deficiency among patients with HS.
News
A recent study showed patients with severe Hurley stage 1 hidradenitis suppurativa experienced improvements and clinical remission following treatment with a combination antibiotic therapy.
News
Findings from a recent chart review showed more significant treatment response among patients who received a biologic compared with other treatments for hidradenitis suppurativa.
News
A recent study assessed the association between wet ear wax and hidradenitis suppurativa among Japanese patients.
News
Findings from a recent study suggest patients with hidradenitis suppurativa have a higher risk for myocardial infarction and cerebrovascular accident.
News
Many patients with hidradenitis suppurativa are interested in making dietary changes to help manage their condition. A recent study investigated the prevalence of dietary alterations among this patient population.
News
In a recent study, researchers investigated the effectiveness of combination intense pulsed light therapy and radiofrequency for treating hidradenitis suppurativa.
Derm Q&A
Melissa Weiss, Associate Editor
Findings from a recent study showed patients with HS have a similar incidence to other well-studied, at-risk patient groups of opioid use, including those with newly diagnosed musculoskeletal pain. Lead study author Sarah Reddy discusses the implications of these findings and the role dermatologists play in identifying patients at-risk for opioid misuse.
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