Chief Medical Editor's Message

Thursday, September 4, 2008
  The return trip home from a lecture in Virginia is on a Cessna 182, a single propeller plane. The pilot sits in front of me and meticulously checks and rechecks each gauge and all sorts of other things I know nothing about. Before we even got in the plane, he had checked and rechecked the plane’s exterior, and he spent quite a bit of time before that checking and rechecking the weather for flight conditions. He is compulsive. Obsessive compulsive. I like that in a pilot. Face It, We’re Compulsive His compulsivity doesn’t strike me as unusual. I&rsquo
Thursday, September 4, 2008
We have many journals in dermatology, with many struggling to find and maintain their niches. New Editor, New Focus at JID It also seems that many of the best of our journals give their editors a limited tour of duty. This year, the editorship changed at one of the flagship dermatology journals, the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, giving those who produce that journal an opportunity to take a fresh look at what it is, what it does, and who it serves. How the Pendulum Swings The JID has been the pre-eminent basic research
Thursday, September 4, 2008
I came across a very interesting blog on WebMD describing the effects of money and insurance on the practice of medicine in the United States. The author, Dr. Ira Kirschenbaum, seemed somewhat pessimistic on the future of American medicine and the potential brain drain due to poor reimbursement. He wrote: “The great sadness of the death of the smaller [medical] groups is that they were the backbone of service and dedication that made American medicine great. Without these groups, we are becoming a bit more of an assembly line of medical practice.”1
Thursday, September 4, 2008
The big news in the media is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection, which is discussed this month in our “Pediatric Patient Care” column on page 38.   Intensified Public Awareness of MRSA It seems like MRSA has been around for quite some time, but now it is hot news and in the public eye. Newspapers, magazines, radio and TV are covering the topic. The schools are sending notifications home to parents when a child has a staph infection resistant to methicillin — even a very minor, limited one. Not surprisingly, my kids are asking me abou
Thursday, October 6, 2011
An inside look at dermatology issues from Steven R. Feldman, MD, PhD
Thursday, June 3, 2010
With the possible exception of antibiotics for infections, isotretinoin offers patients one of the few miracle cures in medicine. Curing a severe acne patient with isotretinoin is one of the highlights of being a dermatologist. Extraordinarily effective for patients with even the most horrible, scarring, debilitating acne, the drug is remarkably well tolerated. The common adverse event — dryness, nose bleeds, cheilitis, etc. — are mere annoyances that patients put up with quite well. There are a couple of side effects, however, that warrant serious attention. Real Isotretinoin Risks</