Eczema Review

A review of recent news, research, and treatment related to eczema.

Progression From Eczema to Asthma and Allergies 

child itching faceChildren with both atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic sensitization at age 1 year have a more than 7-fold increased risk for developing asthma as well as an increased risk for developing food allergies by age 3 years, according to a recent study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.
 

 The study included 2311 children who underwent skin prick testing at age 1 year and were assessed for AD. Children who produced a 2 mm or larger wheal than that elicited by controls in response to 10 inhalant or food allergens were considered sensitized. At age 3, they were evaluated for asthma, allergic rhinitis, food allergy, and AD.

After adjusting for common confounders, the researchers found that AD without allergic sensitization was not associated with an increased risk of asthma at age 3 years (relative risk [RR], 0.46). However, AD with allergic sensitization was associated with a more than 7-fold increased risk of asthma (RR, 7.04). AD and allergic sensitization had significant interactions on the additive (relative excess risk 5.06) and multiplicative (ratio of RRs 5.80) scales in association with asthma risk. Additionally, there was a positive additive interaction between AD and allergic sensitization in their effects on the risk for developing food allergies (relative excess risk 15.11).

“Atopic dermatitis without concomitant allergic sensitization was not associated with an increased risk of asthma. In combination, atopic dermatitis and allergic sensitization had strong interactive effects on both asthma and food allergy risk at age 3 years,” the researchers concluded. 

 

Reference

Tran MM, Lefebvre DL, Dharma C, et al; Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development Study investigators. Predicting the atopic march: Results from the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development Study [published online November 1, 2017]. J Allergy Clin Immunol. doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2017.08.024

 

depression holding legsAD Increases Depression, Anxiety Among Patients 
 

A recent survey by the National Eczema Association (NEA) found that patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) often report a depression or anxiety diagnosis. The NEA surveyed 545 patients with AD. 

Based on the study, it is estimated that more than 30% of adults with AD are diagnosed with anxiety/depression. The prevalence of AD in adults in the United States is estimated to be 7.2% or 18 million. Adults in the United States with AD say that it impacts almost every area of their lives, including profession, intimate relationships, sleep quality, and overall well-being. 

“Atopic dermatitis is a complex disease as this survey shows,” said Julie Block, president and chief executive officer of NEA. “Research reveals this form of eczema goes well beyond what you see on the skin. Chronic inflammation, symptoms such as unbearable itch, being severely allergic to the world around you—these all profoundly affect the quality of life of people with AD.”

To learn more about eczema and mental health and access resources from the NEA, go to https://nationaleczema.org/eczema-emotional-wellness/. 

Article continues on page 2



Select Page:     Next ->